statcounter

       

Hydref 2004 October


This page contains all the articles in the issue.
Either scroll through the page or select the required article in the table below.
To reduce the loading time all advertisements, photographs and graphics have been removed.

If an article is accompanied by photographs,
this may be viewed by opening the individual file through the bi-lingual menu,
or using the article title link.

* indicates an article has photograph() or graphic(s) attached to the individual file

Editorial * Celtic Weekend Plas Hyfryd (St David’s)
Post Office Coffee Morning Llansantffraid Club
Carrog School Diary Bridges. . . .
“Y Bont” Collectors Operation “Christmas Child” Village Hall
Get Well Soon Health Wellies and Wheelbarrows
“Fitness League” * Carrog Junior Choir * Llidiart y Parc
Village Hall Lottery Recipe Letters

Editorial

Happy New &ldquo:Y Bont” Year to everybody! In October 2003 we began &ldquo:Y Bont” as a news sheet with the stated intention of keeping everyone in our bridged community fully informed of past and future events. The first edition was two pages and largely a diary of events, this month we publish with five pages and apart from a diary there are features, photographs and articles. What a difference a year makes!

We can’t always get it completely right - we have had to postpone the Bash to November 13th, but we hope everyone will support the event, especially as children, parent accompanied, will have free entry. But things we have reported upon include the Parc 40 mph - now to be implemented, repairs to the bridge, successes of our young people, events large and small, housing issues, births, engagements, marriages, retirements, deaths and many other matters. And along the way we have created our very own regular columnists in farming and health whose writings we are reliably informed are eagerly awaited by our readers!

The letters page has also proved to be popular. If you have something to say - say it through &ldquo:Y Bont”.

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

* Carrog Celtic Weekend hailed a Success

A total of 10 Bretons and 18 Manx musicians and dancers stayed in Carrog during the weekend of 17th and 18th September for a Celtic Festival to remember Glyndwr.

Thursday saw the arrival of the Bretons who played for and danced with Carrog School on Friday morning and at Dinas Bran School in the afternoon. In the evening they were joined by the Manx and several Welsh Performers in the Village Hall.

Unfortunately due to heavy traffic the Manx were rather late arriving but they quickly changed and joined in the festivities, which continued, for some, into the very early hours of Saturday morning. This did not prevent all Manx and Bretons being up and about to attend the Steam Extravaganza at Rhûg where both groups danced and played. Later in the day both Manx and Bretons played and danced in Corwen, with the Manx dancers holding a workshop for about 100 local school children attending the Festival. As one of the dancers said, “When we invite children in the Island to come and join in we might get 10, here we were overwhelmed by a wave of children wanting to join in. It was very rewarding.”

Everyone then returned to the Grouse for the evening, making an already crowded pub even more so, but amazingly both Breton and Manx musicians found room to play and also found many pieces of music known to both, enabling them to play together.

The dancers showed how very little room they needed to perform in by dancing in the crowded main bar but eventually cleared the pool table to one side and danced in the pool room.

Proceeds from the Friday night, including a £100 contribution from the Grouse, went towards travelling and other expenses.

On Sunday a communal lunch was held by Dick and Janice Sheasby at the Cottage before the Manx were taken by car over the Berwyns. Several messages and letters of thanks have been received from the Manx who would love to return and in fact have been persuaded to take part in next years Eisteddfod.

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Plas Hyfryd (formerly St. Davids)

The Care Standards Agency (CSA) confirm that Mental Health Care UK have submitted an incomplete application for the redesignation of Plas Hyfryd as a Hospital, and is currently not being processed.

The senior officer of the CSA based in Mold has also stated that Mental Health Care will require planning permission before they can proceed - this advice conflicts with that given previously. There are therefore some safeguards in place. Karen Sinclair, our Assembly Member, has written to the CSA and will inform “Y Bont” of any new information she receives.

It is therefore premature to call a public meeting but residents are requested to share any new information they may have with the Community Councillors. Communication would also be improved if Mental Health Care UK could take appropriate action to keep local residents properly informed of their intentions.

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Post Office on the Move

By the middle of October the Post Office will be located in the Village Hall. All the usual services of pensions and allowances, saving stamps, investment accounts, car insurance, Manweb vouchers and of course postage stamps will be available. Banking services for customers of Lloyds, Barclays and Alliance and Leicester are also available. The move has required some changes to opening times which will now be:

TUESDAY - 9.00 am to 12 noon
THURSDAY - 9.00 am to 12 noon.

There will also be a grocery and newspaper delivery service. Please telephone Tina or Chris on 430 221 for further information.

Please also note that access, other than to the entrance hall, will be restricted during Post Office opening hours.

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Coffee Morning held for Village Hall

Mrs. R. D. held a coffee morning at her home for the benefit of the Village Hall at which a total of £111.68 was raised. Many thanks to all who supported it. The raffle was won by Janice Sheasby.

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Llansantffraid Club

The Club meets alternate Thursdays at 2.00 pm in the Village Hall. Recently members have enjoyed two trips to places of interest in the area. Please come and join us. The next meeting is on 30th October.

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Carrog School

The school have officially been awarded the Healthy School prize by Sioned Bowen, the Director of Lifelong Learning, in a ceremony in Llangollen. Pupils from Year 5 & 6 joined children from neighbouring schools in Llanferres to meet the author Alan Gibbons who shared his story writing ideas with the children.

Rachel Davenport and Amber Boydell have been appointed as Road Safety Officers.

Pupils from Years 1, 2 & 3 joined other schools from the Edeyrnion and Penllyn area to launch the CD of Welsh nursery rhymes ‘Hwyl a Heidi Ho’ which was recorded in Bala during the Summer Term. Oliver Knight received the CD on behalf of Carrog School. The children enjoyed a morning of song and story telling in the Leisure Centre in Bala.

During the Celtic weekend Carrog School was visited by the Breton musicians who played for and danced with the children. Full story in the article - Carrog Celtic Weekend Hailed A Success.

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Talking Of Bridges . . . .

I could badly have done with one during the week beginning the 13th September when all attempts to return to Carrog from the Isle of Man were thwarted by the cancellation of ferries because of the strong winds. Normally this would have been an inconvenience which one learns to cope with having spent the greater part of ones life ‘clinging to a rock in the middle of the Irish Sea’ (as one reporter described the IOM). However, on this occasion our return was somewhat more urgent as eighteen Manx musicians and dancers were due to arrive in Carrog on the Friday of that week. The majority of them were flying and it began to look as if they would arrive before we could return.

One of the problems is the Liverpool boat leaves at 7.00 am and cars must report one hour earlier. Add half an hour for travelling to the ferry terminal and very quickly you realise you must be up at 4.00 am. This is not bad on one occasion but for three mornings on the run the sense of humour begins to slip. Bearing in mind we should have been back in Carrog around 11.00 am on Monday and finally arrived at 2.30 am on Thursday, the joys of Island life begin to pale.

Prior to the introduction of fast ferries and big ‘roll on roll off’ ferries, the Isle of Man Steam Packet could genuinely be described as a bridge to the Island as the ships were designed for the Irish Sea and always sailed. On one occasion we spent nine hours crossing from Liverpool to the IOM. Christine and I were sea sick for the whole journey and our previous dog, then only a puppy, was also sea sick. Standing up was virtually impossible and windows on the upper decks were stove in by the waves, allowing water to flow through the passenger accommodation. The car deck looked like a section of motorway after a pile up.

Come to think of it maybe cancellation is better than always sailing regardless of weather.

Paul Fisher

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

“Y Bont” Collectors

Anyone who can produce a complete set of “Y Bont” numbers 1-13 at the “Y Bont” Bash will be entered in a prize draw to win a bottle of Famous Grouse (for obvious reasons the editors and their families are excluded from this draw!)

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Do Something Special For Christmas

With Operation Christmas Child. Give a child, somewhere else in the world, a special Christmas by filling a shoe box with toys and necessities that really make a difference. Contact Mrs B. Hindley or telephone 0870 011 2002 or visit www.samaritanspurse.uk.com

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Health Matters

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

This is a common condition that affects one in five people in the UK. Some people have mild occasional symptoms, for example, at times of stress or eating certain foods which trigger symptoms. Others may have symptoms for long periods of time. Most people fall somewhere in between.

The exact cause is not known, there are no tests to prove IBS; it is usually diagnosed by the symptoms. Tests may be done to rule out other conditions such as colitis. It is very important to report a change in bowel habit that goes on for more than 2 weeks if you have not already been diagnosed as having IBS. In a healthy bowel the food is passed along by regular contractions (squeezes), the symptoms of IBS occur if the contractions are abnormal or overactive. Common symptoms are:

Pain - often described as colic,
Bloating of the abdomen - more wind than normal may be passed
Diarrhoea or constipation - some people experience both at different times
Other symptoms can include headache, belching, feeling sick, poor appetite and an irritable bladder
Passing blood is not a symptom of irritable bowel and should be reported to your doctor if it occurs.

What are the treatments?

Reassurance - it is good to be told it is IBS and not something more serious: don’t sit at home worrying, see your Doctor if you have symptoms.
Fibre - some people benefit from extra fibre in the diet, usually those who find constipation the main problem. If Diarrhoea - is the main symptom it may make things worse.
Antispasmodics - they work by relaxing the muscles of the intestine, different ones work in different ways. Therefore, if one does not work it is well worth trying a different one. When one works it can be taken as and when symptoms flare up to calm things down.
Diet - some people are successful in controlling their symptoms by identifying foods that cause symptoms and avoiding them.
Stress - people with anxious personalities may find symptoms difficult to control. The relationship between the mind and the over activity of the gut is a complex one. Some people find relaxation techniques and stress counseling and similar therapies useful.

For further help and advice The IBS network, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield, S5 7AU Tel: 0114 2611531

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

New Residents

A warm welcome to Ian, Karen and Billy Ravenscroft who have now moved into Cae Glas.

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Village Hall Committee Meeting

The following matters represent the main points at the meeting:

The Post Office is to be allowed the use of the Village Hall on Tuesday and Thursday mornings for the benefit of the Village.
A new lock has been fitted to the entrance door and a full list of keyholders will now be maintained.
There was considerable discussion about the ongoing costs of running the Village Hall and the voluntary contributions from organisations.
A cheque for £400 has been received from the 100 Club but it was pointed out that more members are still needed
A donation has been made for the purchase of a new outside notice board.

A full set of the minutes may be obtained from the Secretary.

Date of next meeting - Monday 2004.

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Fitness League Classes To Start

Christine Fisher, who is a qualified Fitness League teacher, is holding classes in the Village Hall on Thursdays at 7.30 pm - 8.30 pm. The classes are aimed mainly at women but anyone is welcome to attend.

The Fitness League started in 1930 as the Womens League of Health and Beauty with the aim of improving womens health by exercising to music under qualified supervision. This is known as the TFL technique.

It is well established that regular practice of the technique leads to:

Improved posture - more energy - a toned body - increased muscular strength - flexible joints - better co-ordination - stability.

The technique is suitable for people of all ages. A charge of £3.00 per session will be made to contribute to Village Hall funds. Participants will need to bring a towel or mat for floor exercises. For further information telephone Christine on 430397.

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Planning

The Church in Wales have now applied for change of use to that of residential purposes for the Glebe Land adjoining the Smithy. The DCC has made this application public and invited comments prior to determining the application.

We have also been asked if the money from the sale of this land will directly benefit Carrog. This land is owned by the Church in Wales and not Llansantffraid and there is no provision for monies received to directly benefit Carrog.

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

* Carrog Junior Choir

Pictured above are the members of Carrog Juvenile choir, the year is not known. Can any of our readers identify anybody and give a clue to the year.

(Picture submitted by Mrs Brown whose Grandparents were Carrog people.)

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Wellies And Wheelbarrows

Having spent a lot of time and effort over the last few weeks trying to get the ewes and rams in the peak of condition ready for tupping, you can imagine my frustration when one of my rams decided to go lame a few days prior to his big day. For the majority of the year the rams are required to do nothing more than eat and sleep and they tend to cause one no trouble. However, the minute I need them to earn their keep all sorts of ailments appear. The three yearling rams I bought last week have spent every day patrolling the fences, desperate to get to the ewes. So when I turned them into a bunch of ewes yesterday, they piled in heads down and tight together like the legendary Pont y Pool front row. They then proceeded to sniff the ewes backsides (I’m not sure if the Pont y Pool front row got up to that sort of thing) curled their top lips and promptly started beating the living daylights out of each other. (Now THAT sounds like the Pont yPool front row - Ed.) I watched them for a while and finally decided they’d sort it out for themselves and left them to it.

With a bit of a lull in the farming calendar I took the opportunity to catch up with a few unfinished jobs. I’ve worked on my new shed on and off through the year and have nearly completed it and would have done had I not decided to concrete a small yard where the cattle exercise through the winter. Whilst concreting the yard I managed to break the cement mixer and now have a half concreted yard as well as an incomplete shed.

Mr. Woodhall (the Vet.) called earlier on in the month to pregnancy diagnose the cows and I was most disappointed with the results. Although he thought possibly it was a bit early after service to determine pregnancy and therefore the results could not be guaranteed, I brought the bull back to the cows just to be certain. I haven’t seen him show any interest in the cows since his return and I’m hoping this is a good sign and that I’ll get better results when Mr. Woodhall returns next month.

Gareth Llan.
© Copyright Gareth Bryan - 2004

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Village Hall Lottery Winners

No. 19 Brynle Hughes - 20
No. 14 Commander Bradshaw - 10

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

* Llidiart y Parc

A reminder of when Carrog and Parc had more than one shop. Parc shop closed over 20 years ago

(From a postcard submitted by Edgar Jones.)

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Get Well Soon

We wish a speedy recovery to Rhagfyr who has been unwell.

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Diary

“Y Bont” Bash - 13th November.
Church Christmas Fair - 25th November.
Carols Round Xmas Tree - 2nd December.
Harvest Thanksgiving Services.
Owain Glyndwr Snooker League.
    Results 04/10/04: Carrog 2 - Llandrillo ‘A’ 4

Diary Additions

Ederynion Historical Society
Tuesday - 26th October 7.30 pm. Talk by Mr. D. R. Jones (a descendant of the Parc Shop family) will be talking on Lady Herbert Lewis - 1st Lady of Welsh Folk Song. Everyone welcome.

Village Hall Committee Meeting
7.00 pm. Monday 15th November

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

This Months Recipe

Cheese Soup - Swp Caws

4 oz. cheese
1 large carrot
1 large onion
1 large potato
1 stick celery
1.1/4 pints water
1/4 pint single cream salt and pepper
2 teaspoons chopped parsley
2 chicken stock cubes

Peel and dice the carrot and potato. Skin and dice the onion. Cut up the celery. Dissolve the stock cubes in the water. Add the vegetables. Season to taste and simmer for 15-20 minutes until all the vegetables are soft. Grate the cheese and add with the cream. Heat but do not boil. Stir in the parsley and serve hot.

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Letters

All letters must be accompanied by name and address of the writers. Opinions expressed in letters to &ldquo:Y Bont” are purely those of the writers, however the editors reserve the right to edit letters submitted.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Dutch Visitors Already Miss Carrog

The two English courses we ran in your village this August were quite successful, not in the least because Carrog is so beautiful and hospitable. It’s very easy to feel at home when everyone is friendly and patient; where all seems quiet and peaceful, and every look at the landscape takes your breath away. One of our students literally got tears in his eyes, when he tried to describe how he felt about your valley.

So we hope to be back next year, with a fresh load of students!

Our best wishes to all of you,

Marion & Steve

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The following letter has been received from ‘Perree Bane’ (White Jackets) the Manx dance group:

On behalf of the group I would like to thank you and the Committee for a most memorable and enjoyable weekend in Carrog. Some may have been memorable for the wrong reason, but strangely it did not seem to detract from the enjoyment.

You all did everything possible to make our stay a most pleasant one and you certainly succeeded.

Many thanks once again. Best regards.

John Dowling, Secretary.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Dear Bont

We would like to say how much we have enjoyed Gareth Llan for his well written pieces on his farming life. Keep it up.

Eileen and Glyn Williams

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Dear Editor,

About “a village is for life, not just for Christmas” (July and August issues). Of course I’m an outsider, who knows little about the reality of living in Carrog. On the other hand, I also live in a village - called Vogelenzang and dating back to the 12th century.

What happened there in recent years seems relevant to your discussion.

About fifty years ago, Carrog and Vogelenzang must have been similar in size. Both had a railway station, a couple of shops, a post office, a school and more than one pub. Both were situated in farmland and while we had only one church instead of three places of worship, the communities can’t have been very different.

Then things began to change. The car and improved roads connected Vogelenzang much more intimately to rapidly growing cities. Trains continued to pass through, but ceased to stop at our railway station, which was converted into a shop selling antiques and fireplaces. Twenty three years ago, Marion and I bought a small house in the old main street. The pub and the post office were still there at the time; a few years later, the pub died. Recently we also lost our post office. These “beating hearts of the community” disappeared despite rapid growth of the village, which at the start of this year counted 2,272 inhabitants.

Building more houses seems to have done very little for our community. The old core of the village looks unchanged, but around it you’ll find a faceless suburbia. The two schools (one religious, the other not) appear to be doing fine; the village hall sees plenty of use, and we even have soccer and tennis clubs. But what we’ll soon be left with is a suburb with a few old buildings in the center. The village is passing away.

Village life, I think, may well evolve to deal with the village as a place which most young people leave - some returning when they are a little older, and cities like Sheffield lose their appeal. It may even survive when the village becomes a place to retire to. But it seems to me that what makes a village tick depends on being small scale and far away from big cities, in the countryside. A population approaching 400 sounds about right. Up to such a number it’s possible to know nearly everyone at least by name. All else you really need are a few community-minded people and a few places to meet informally, like a pub, a post office and a shop.

Reviving the shop and making it work is likely to be worth the trouble. Other matters may be less relevant. Holiday homes? Make sure they pay their way if at all possible, but don’t worry too much about them. A few more houses? Perhaps, but increasing numbers proved to be no panacea, here in Vogelenzang.

Steven Bolt, Dutch Visitor.

Δ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

© All material is Copyright of “Y Bont” unless otherwise indicated at the end of the article